Hearty Sauerkraut Soup

Hearty Sauerkraut Soup

My husband’s ancestors are Irish and German yet he doesn’t like cabbage or sauerkraut! If he didn’t look exactly like his siblings I’d think he was adopted. Cabbage was often on the table during the summer months in my childhood home and mom would prepare enough sauerkraut to last us over the winter.

I always liked the process of preparing the cabbage for pickling/fermenting/curing: coring the cabbage heads (and eating few cores which have mild horseradish flavor); filling the core holes with salt; placing heads in a large barrel with some shredded cabbage as well and covering with water after which the barrel is hermetically sealed. Then the wait begins.


There are many uses for sauerkraut in our cuisine, but my favorite is stuffed cured cabbage leaves (sarma) and I will share that recipe with you in the future but since finding a whole cured cabbage heads is difficult here in the States, this sauerkraut soup is the best substitute. It uses the same ingredients except there is no stuffing involved.  Although this winter is officially over and this, as mentioned, is traditionally a winter dish, it doesn’t rule out enjoying it in still cool evenings. Serve with boiled potatoes or crusty bread like this artisan.

 

Ingredients:
Serves 4-6
2 pounds Sauerkraut, preferably from a bag
1 pound ground Beef
½ pound smoked slab Bacon
1 (14 oz.) package Polish Kielbasa (or another smoked sausage)
1 large Onion
2 Garlic cloves
¼ cup Rice
2 Bay leaves
1 tablespoon Paprika
1 tablespoon Tomato Paste
4-5 black Peppercorns
2 tablespoons Oil or pork lard
3 cups Water, plus more if needed
Salt and pepper to taste

 

Directions:

Rinse sauerkraut and leave in colander to drain. Dice bacon and onion, mince the garlic and slice the sausage.

Cook onion and bacon in oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the sausage and cook until edges start to brown. Add ground beef and cook, stirring frequently, until no longer pink. Do not allow the beef to brown. Stir in sauerkraut, garlic, bay leaves, peppercorns, and paprika. Add one cup water, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes. Stir in tomato paste and remaining water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat. Add rice, cover and simmer for another 30 minutes. Season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

Note: taste before adding salt as sauerkraut, bacon and sausage are naturally salty.

Hearty Sauerkraut Soup

Hearty Sauerkraut Soup

Hearty Sauerkraut Soup

Hearty Sauerkraut Soup

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Yield: Serves 4-8

Hearty Sauerkraut Soup

A substitute for stuffed cured cabbage leaves (sarma) this unstuffed hearty soup is stuffed (pun intended) with the same great flavors.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds Sauerkraut, preferably from a bag
  • 1 pound ground Beef
  • ½ pound smoked slab Bacon
  • 1 (14 oz.) package Polish Kielbasa (or another smoked sausage)
  • 1 large Onion
  • 2 Garlic cloves
  • ¼ cup Rice
  • 2 Bay leaves
  • 1 tablespoon Paprika
  • 1 tablespoon Tomato Paste
  • 4-5 black Peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoons Oil or pork lard
  • 3 cups Water, plus more if needed
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Rinse sauerkraut and leave in colander to drain. Dice bacon and onion, mince the garlic and slice the sausage.

Cook onion and bacon in oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat until lightly browned. Add the sausage and cook until edges start to brown. Add ground beef and cook, stirring frequently, until no longer pink. Do not allow the beef to brown. Stir in sauerkraut, garlic, bay leaves, peppercorns and paprika. Add one cup water, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes. Stir in tomato paste and remaining water and bring to a boil. Lower the heat. Add rice, cover and simmer for another 30 minutes. Season the soup with salt and pepper to taste.

Note: taste before adding salt as sauerkraut, bacon and sausage are naturally salty.

https://all-thats-jas.com/2015/03/hearty-sauerkraut-soup.html

 

Looking forward to connecting with you soon.

For more quick recipes and tips follow my All that’s Jas Facebook page or social network of your preference. It makes my day 🙂

 

Follow me

Jas

publisher and creative director at All that's Jas
Jas is a cheesecake addict and the author of Balkan Comfort Food cookbook available on Amazon. You can download a free excerpt of the book when you subscribe to All that's Jas newsletter updates. To learn more about Jas visit her About page.
Follow me
Previous Story
Next Story

15 Comment

  1. Reply
    25 Delicious Soup Recipe Round-Up
    March 12, 2017 at 9:09 am

    […] HEARTY SAUERKRAUT SOUP by yours truly […]

  2. Reply
    Thursday Favorite Things 211 -
    October 21, 2015 at 9:02 pm

    […] Sarma – stuffed, cured cabbage leaves. The kind sauerkraut is made from. I’ll share the recipe here soon enough. Until then, try my unstuffed sarma soup. […]

  3. Reply
    joylovefood
    April 4, 2015 at 5:15 pm

    I love sauerkraut, this soup sounds delicious! Thanks for sharing at What’d You Do This Weekend? I hope you will join us again this Monday!

    1. Reply
      allthatsjas
      April 4, 2015 at 8:28 pm

      Thank you, Joy!

  4. Reply
    Gentle Joy
    April 3, 2015 at 10:53 am

    We like saurkraut (all except for my husband! ) but I have never made something like this….. Thank you.

    1. Reply
      allthatsjas
      April 3, 2015 at 12:36 pm

      What is with our husbands, right? My will go for all the meat in this soup, but not touch the sauerkraut. Thanks for stopping by 🙂

  5. Reply
    Holly
    April 1, 2015 at 3:29 pm

    Thank you for linking up with Waiting on…Wednesday! Have a wonderful day!

    1. Reply
      allthatsjas
      April 2, 2015 at 8:20 am

      You too, Holly!

  6. Reply
    Carpet cleaning Hammersmith
    March 31, 2015 at 6:41 am

    MMM so delicious! And so much meat – yummy!

  7. Reply
    Barbara
    March 30, 2015 at 4:43 pm

    Thank you, thank you for this! I just had a consultation with a chinese herbologist who recommended I eat some little something that’s fermented once a day – and sauerkraut was one of her suggestions. When I made an icky face, she said, “yes, that’s most people’s reactions but if you have good sauerkraut – you may react differently.” So I did try a new kind from the health food store and I do like it. This soup looks delicious – we have German ancestry too so grew up on things like this. Stopping in today from Grand Social. You have a beautiful blog. So glad to have found you.

    1. Reply
      allthatsjas
      March 31, 2015 at 9:16 am

      Thank you, Barbara, for your kind words! I’m so glad my recipe can help 🙂 I love sauerkraut, but I’m not sure if I could eat it every day, lol. Have you tried it as a salad? Just add some oil and fresh ground black pepper to uncooked sauerkraut and that’s it! It is really good and that way you intake it daily without having to make a meal out of it. Hope you like it too! Hugs!

  8. Reply
    Patti
    March 29, 2015 at 7:20 pm

    All I can say is …. YUM!!! This looks delicious! I’m pinning this for later.
    Patti

    1. Reply
      allthatsjas
      March 30, 2015 at 10:16 am

      Thank you kindly, Patti!

  9. Reply
    Jasna
    March 28, 2015 at 6:00 pm

    I LOVE sauerkraut in any form! I suppose this version of yours is influenced by Germans, and they know how to use it. Yum!
    btw, no problem coming here today 🙂

    1. Reply
      allthatsjas
      March 29, 2015 at 3:41 pm

      Hi Jasna, thanks for stopping by. You are absolutely right – Germans know best how to use sauerkraut! Glad there were no problems in “crossing the border” today. 😀

Leave a Reply

CommentLuv badge

%d bloggers like this: